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Indic Snippets by default-cube Indic Snippets :icondefault-cube:default-cube 0 0 The Original Apple Watch--Back by default-cube The Original Apple Watch--Back :icondefault-cube:default-cube 1 0 The Original Apple Watch--Front by default-cube The Original Apple Watch--Front :icondefault-cube:default-cube 1 0 Van Rossum's Triangle by default-cube Van Rossum's Triangle :icondefault-cube:default-cube 1 0 That Certain Logo Timeslice Down by default-cube That Certain Logo Timeslice Down :icondefault-cube:default-cube 1 0 Spy Ring Rotate Timeslice Down by default-cube Spy Ring Rotate Timeslice Down :icondefault-cube:default-cube 0 0 Spy Ring Tour Timeslice Across by default-cube Spy Ring Tour Timeslice Across :icondefault-cube:default-cube 0 0 Questworld Timeslice Across by default-cube Questworld Timeslice Across :icondefault-cube:default-cube 2 0 Futuro House Timeslice Across by default-cube Futuro House Timeslice Across :icondefault-cube:default-cube 0 0 Spy Ring Rotate Timeslice Across by default-cube Spy Ring Rotate Timeslice Across :icondefault-cube:default-cube 0 0 Jeannie's Bottle by default-cube Jeannie's Bottle :icondefault-cube:default-cube 4 1 Kepler's Third Law by default-cube Kepler's Third Law :icondefault-cube:default-cube 0 0
Literature
Computer Graphics And The Wheel Of Reincarnation
There is a  paper from 1968 which described a recurring pattern in the design of computer graphics hardware: it would turn out that certain graphics algorithms were too slow to run on general-purpose CPUs, so simple specialized hardware was created to speed up those functions. Then the algorithms got more complicated, and so did the specialized hardware. Eventually the hardware was effectively turning into something resembling a general-purpose CPU. Whereupon it was found worthwhile to offload certain functions onto yet another layer of specialist hardware, and so the circle went round again.
The precise details of those specialist functions are no longer relevant with today’s technology. But I think the general principle still applies.
Before delving more into this, first let us be clear about the two main kinds of 3D graphics rendering: there is real-time rendering, where successive frames have to be output f
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Literature
What Happened To The Future?
Those of a certain age (like myself) remember the era of techno-optimism in the 1960s and even earlier: by the year 2000, we would have flying cars and personal jetpacks, and taking holidays on the Moon, and manned exploration of the other planets of our solar system would be well underway.
For one idea of what this future would look like, just watch the classic movie 2001: A Space Odyssey from 1968. There are other portrayals from around that era along similar lines.
So what actually happened? Instead of routine rocketry and widespread space travel, we got computers and the Internet, mobile phones, high-definition TV--the whole panoply of digital technology. We did get some manned space travel (the International Space Station has been permanently manned since November 2000), but no-one has left low Earth orbit since the last Apollo Moon landing in 1972: manned space travel still remains complicated, expensive, and danger
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Space-Cadet Keyboard by default-cube Space-Cadet Keyboard :icondefault-cube:default-cube 1 0
Literature
Computer Graphics In 1980s Movies
This is an overview of selected examples of the state of the art in computer graphics animation as illustrated at various points in the 1980s. I am going to talk specifically about prerendered (non-realtime) animations, since in any case realtime videogame-style 3D was practically unheard of back then.
During this time, there was nothing really close to realistic human computer-generated figures. The best that could be done in the earlier part of the decade shows up in Looker (1981). This one is notable for having a few attempts at modelled human shapes: a face with a moderately decent polygon count that resembles actor Susan Dey, a somewhat lower-poly hand, a pair of eyeballs, and a (briefly-glimpsed) complete figure. And there is no attempt at animation of these shapes, beyond simple rotations of the entire objects. The rest is a heavy dose of wireframe renderings (including human outlines)--very common during this period.
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Space Bus by The-Artistic-Hermit Space Bus :iconthe-artistic-hermit:The-Artistic-Hermit 3 0 Constitution Luxury Class by mattwileyart Constitution Luxury Class :iconmattwileyart:mattwileyart 326 116
Literature
Math Limerick
A dozen, a gross, and a score,
Plues three times the square root of four,
Divided by seven,
Plues five times eleven,
Is nine squared, and not a bit more
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Retro Diner by IceXDragon Retro Diner :iconicexdragon:IceXDragon 147 63 Nightlife by sinakasra Nightlife :iconsinakasra:sinakasra 1,252 43
Journal
The lessons of fanfiction so far
I experiment with web content constantly as part of my work. I start new sites and fill them with content just to see how people react. That's what my post on the Bioware forums was, what this site I started originally was. Both surprised me with the audience reaction.
I've been learning a lot from these fanfic experiences. Here's what I've got so far:
1) Quality does not necessarily mean more hits/popularity; in fact, it seems like the lower the quality and more populist the topic, the higher the hits. However, the popularity is only temporary.
2) Regular updates (not necessarily fast updates) will bring more repeat visitors, even on a less populist story
3) Popularity and level of engagement (e.g. comments and follows) do not go hand-in-hand
4) Irregular reviews tend to be more helpful than gushing reviews for every chapter, but the latter bring more overall
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Inkscape Tutorials by ArtistsHospital Inkscape Tutorials :iconartistshospital:ArtistsHospital 326 22
03:44
Lista - Diploma in Animation :iconplyczkowski:PLyczkowski 1,281 238
Thunderbird 5 by Harnois75 Thunderbird 5 :iconharnois75:Harnois75 87 16 Blakes 7 - London by Harnois75 Blakes 7 - London :iconharnois75:Harnois75 25 6 Girl on the Moon by Harnois75 Girl on the Moon :iconharnois75:Harnois75 158 42 FAB 1 redesign by Harnois75 FAB 1 redesign :iconharnois75:Harnois75 93 20 Thunderbird 1 redesign by Harnois75 Thunderbird 1 redesign :iconharnois75:Harnois75 124 18 Thunderbird 3 redesign by Harnois75 Thunderbird 3 redesign :iconharnois75:Harnois75 85 3 Thunderbirds scale chart by Harnois75 Thunderbirds scale chart :iconharnois75:Harnois75 136 29 Forest Hallway by ArthurBlue Forest Hallway :iconarthurblue:ArthurBlue 684 56

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Van Rossum's Triangle
This is a diagram I threw together to try to make sense of the intricate web of interrelationships between generators, coroutines and mainline code in Python 3.5 and later.

Basically, both generators and coroutines have “send()” methods that can be used to start them running from the mainline (a “mainline” being whatever code starts executing to begin with in a Python program, plus whatever functions/methods it calls etc). A coroutine can use the “await”-construct on any “awaitable” object (one that has an “__await__()” method) to transfer control to it. Generators are awaitable. A generator can execute a “yield”-construct to transfer control back to the mainline. The mainline can then use a “send()” method call to resume execution; if the generator then does a “return” (or, equivalently, its execution falls off the end of the function), this returns control to the “await”ing coroutine.

Coroutines can also use “await” to transfer control between each other.

And, just for added fun, generators and coroutines can also invoke “send()” methods on other generators and coroutines, thereby becoming mainlines within mainlines.

This web of language mechanisms is the basis on which the entire asyncio event-loop architecture is built.
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Lawrence D’Oliveiro
New Zealand
Freelance software developer specializing in Linux, including Android. Also known to mess about with Blender 3D software.

I have posted some short animations on Vimeo: vimeo.com/user17229068/videos and published code on GitHub: github.com/ldo

:iconblenderlogoplz: :iconprogrammingplz: :iconlinuxplz: :icon3dhdplz: :iconscienced:
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:iconligr77:
ligr77 Featured By Owner Mar 18, 2017
Hi default-cube!

Thanks for the visit to my Raygun Gothic group! If you have any pieces you want to drop by there, you're more than welcome to do so!
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:iconseishinami:
Seishinami Featured By Owner Edited Feb 19, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
I really like the code exercises. Too bad I only can understand Java @ this stage.. not a lot of Java though because I'm just a beginner ;d
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:icondefault-cube:
default-cube Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2016
If you like programming, do a lot of it, and you will learn that way.

Also try different languages. There are much more interesting ones than Java around. Like Python, for example. Or Lisp.
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:iconseishinami:
Seishinami Featured By Owner Feb 19, 2016  Hobbyist General Artist
Thanks for the amazing resource!
I would try a different language but school curriculum starts off with Java, so I have to stick with it for now. (:
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:iconunusualsuspex:
unusualsuspex Featured By Owner Jun 5, 2015  Hobbyist Digital Artist
:iconthxwatchplz: Hope I can live up to your expectations I salute you!
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:icondefault-cube:
default-cube Featured By Owner Jun 6, 2015
You have already done some breathtaking work. :thumbsup:
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